Colour days

Across the past couple of decades, a number of causes have become associated by proponents of supporting them with specific colours:  pink for breast cancer research, red for AIDS awareness, etc. It seems that Nova Scotia may be the heart of the colour association complex.

My very first week here on the job, that strange September collection of days when I was looking for a place to live and meeting what seemed like a cast of thousands for the first time, the local paper carried a story that quickly grew to one of international note:  a couple high school grade 12 boys had come to the defense of a younger boy who had worn a pink shirt to school and had been bullied for it. The older boys “retaliated” on the younger ones behalf not with fists but through a show of solidarity, getting many of their peers to wear pink shirts in a show of support. From there, the campaign grew and this past September there was an official Anti-Bullying Day in communities way beyond Nova Scotia, marked by kids donning pink.

this year, Nova Scotians, again led by a little child, have taken on Epilepsy Awareness through the wearing purple. Now, in this case, wearing purple for the sake of raising topical awareness wasn’t the kid’s invention, but the fact is one 9-year-old got lots and lots of adults, as well as kids to put it on and talk about the condition.

And it is true that colour seems to be taken more seriously here, or people are more sensitive to colour.  I don’t mean all the ways “colour” is used a  synonym, but the light refracting qualities, the physical experience and the symbolism that can be attached to that experience.  Maybe it’s the natural environment, but people talk about pinks and purples and blues and shades and tints and hues and wearing this green or that burgundy in much the same way as, in other places, talking about brands seems relevant.

Colour, it seems, is intrinsically Nova Scotian.

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One Response to “Colour days”

  1. carole leita Says:

    what a nice observation.

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